Saturday, March 25, 2017

Quote from The Principles of Sufism

The Principles of Sufism

by Aisha al-Bauniyyah, translated by Th. Emil Homerin

New York University Press, New York, NY      © 2016       139 pp.


From the Introduction: 'A'ishah al-Ba'uniyyah (d. 923 / 1517 a.d.) was an exceptional Muslim scholar. She was a mystic, and a prolific poet and writer, composing more works in Arabic than any other woman prior to the twentieth century. In her writings, 'A'ishah often speaks of her abiding love for God and his prophet Muhammad, and her quest for mystical union. These concerns are central to The Principles of Sufism, a mystical guide book that 'A'ishah compiled to help others on this spiritual path.   (p. xix)



The Third Principle: Remembrance (Dhikr)

3.1  God the Exalted has said, 'Therefore, remember Me, and I will remember you.'

3.2  Al-Qushayri (may God be pleased with him) writes:
The way for the literalists is: 'Therefore remember Me' with proper conduct, and 'I will remember you' with miracles. But for the folk seeking mystical allusions, the way is: 'So remember Me' by leaving everything else, 'and I will remember you' by resurrecting you in My reality after your annihilation from yourselves.  It is said, 'Therefore remember Me' content with Me without need of My grace and favors, 'and I will remember you' satisfied with you without your actions.  It is said, 'Therefore remember Me' recalling My remembrance on your behalf.  For were it not for My Prior remembrance of you, you would have no subsequent remembrance.  It is said, 'Therefore remember Me' by severing attachments, 'and I will remember you' to whomever I address . . .  It is said, 'Therefore remember Me' with the tongue, 'and I will remember you' in the heart.  (p. 38)

-- submitted by Jennifer Knight

To visit the blog and see more reviews and quotes from books in the collection of Center for Sacred Sciences' Library, click here https://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The Wisdom of No Escape, and the Path of Loving-Kindness

The Wisdom of No Escape, and the Path of Loving-Kindness

by Pema Chodron

Shambhala, Boston, Massachusetts        © 1991     110 pp.

Simple, folksy, accessible, alive — these are some of the ways to describe the series of teachings in this short volume. Given by a Buddhist nun in the tradition of her teacher, Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, they exemplify some basic points of Buddhism. She points out the universality of our desires to avoid (escape from) uncomfortable parts of our lives and of our futile attempts to hold on to preferable experiences. Focusing on the idea that to try to escape the experiences of human life is to bring more suffering, she suggests ways to face what we all encounter and use it to wake up. With simplicity, clarity and heart, she presents a few relevant practices to do wherever one is on the path, so that any reader truly wishing to wake up can find little excuse for remaining completely asleep.

— reviewed by Dawn Kurzka

To visit the blog and see more reviews and quotes from books in the collection of Center for Sacred Sciences' Library, click here https://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com

Friday, March 17, 2017

Surprised by Grace

Surprised by Grace: A Journey Beyond Personal Enlightenment
by Amber Terrell

True Light Publishing, Boulder, Colorado        © 1997       247 pp.

Life in the spiritual fast-lane under unbearable light would be a description of this account. A long-term meditator, Amber Terrell was magnetized upon first encountering her Satguru Gangaji. Finding herself engulfed in longing and horror, pulled along in spite of herself, taken over in dreams and burning for hours, she managed to follow the path stumbling, crawling, and at times being carried. She has entered the river and there is no getting out. Seemingly, the lineage of Ramana Maharshi, Poogaji and Gangaji has claimed her for its own. Finally the illusion of the searcher disappears and “self-discovery unfolds endlessly.” (p. 241)

-- reviewed by Dawn Kurzka
 

To visit the blog and see more reviews and quotes from books in the collection of Center for Sacred Sciences' Library, click here https://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com

Monday, March 13, 2017

Quote from The Beginner's Guide to Walking the Buddha's Eightfold Path

The Beginner's Guide to Walking the Buddha's Eightfold Path

by Jean Smith

Bell Tower, New York, New York     © 2002      239 pp.


"The Buddha-to-be's first recognition of impermanence -- and suffering -- occurred when he initially encountered aging, illness, and death. These hallmarks of our impermanence are unavoidable, they are not personal (they happen to everyone), and they seem to generate storytelling at an uncommonly high level.

In one of these unasked-for growth opportunities, I had the chance to learn a lot about these three aspects of impermanence. In 1998 I became ill with a debilitating disease that was life-threatening and overnight turned me into a person whose physical limitations were those of someone quite old. This ferociously enthusiastic mountain-climbing woman suddenly -- and years later -- could not even walk up her driveway without experiencing shortness of breath, fatigue, and pain . . . " (p. 27)

-- submitted by Jennifer Knight

To visit the blog and see more reviews and quotes from books in the collection of Center for Sacred Sciences' Library, click here https://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Quote from Amitabha

Amitabha: The Buddha of Light and Life 

Written and illustrated by Demi

Demi Books    ©2009    unpaged


One of the most beautiful children's books in our collection. Slip-cased edition of the life of Amitabha Buddha all in purple and gold. Thank you Kathy H.

"Amitabha Buddha's discriminating wisdom knows each thing by itself and all things as one.  His spirit pervades everything, everywhere, and so He is one with everyone."




-- quote submitted by Jennifer Knight



To visit the blog and see more reviews and quotes from books in the collection of Center for Sacred Sciences' Library, click here https://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com

 

Sunday, March 5, 2017

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

by Demi

Margaret K. McElderry Books, New York, New York     © 2007         42 pp.


This is surely adult reading disguised as a children's picture book. It is an exquisitely turned-out volume. Demi's small, delicate, porcelain-like figures, surrounded by acres of space, make a perfect visual vehicle for the Tao. After Demi relates some of the legends concerning Lao Tzu, she presents 20 of the 81 passages of the Tao Te Ching, each with accompanying illustration. In this brief volume, there is a wealth of spiritual teaching. You will want to take it home, sit with it, and be graced.


-- reviewed by Wesley Lachman

To visit the blog and see more reviews and quotes from books in the collection of Center for Sacred Sciences' Library click here https://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com


Friday, March 3, 2017

Book Club April 2017 -- Feeding Your Demons

Book Club -- April & May 2017 --

Due to the juicy practices in this book, we'll be reading it for two months.  At our April meeting we will see a video biography of Tsultrim also called "Feeding Your Demons"

In May we will discuss the book and our practices: Feeding Your Demons: Ancient Wisdom for Resolving Inner Conflict  by Tsultrim Allione



Hosted by the Center for Sacred Sciences Library
When: Thursday, April  6, 2017 Time: 2:30 – 3:30 pm
Where: 5440 Saratoga Street, Eugene, OR 97405, USA




To visit the blog and see what the book club is thinking of reading next click here http://centerforsacredscienceslibrary.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_9.html